Alamance County could see from 6 to 10 inches of rain through Wednesday as the remnants of Hurricane Florence move through the area, the National Weather Service said Sunday, Sept. 16.

Rainfall began picking up in Alamance County mid-morning Sunday. By then, Florence had weakened to a tropical depression.

In the meantime, first responders in Alamance County remain alert for flooding and other emergencies. The county’s shelter at the Graham Recreation Center at 311 College St. remains open for Alamance County residents and for those east of the area seeking refuge.

On Sunday morning, Susan Osborne, director of the Alamance County Department of Social Services, and others continued to run the county’s Emergency Operations Center at the Alamance County Family Justice Center on Martin Street in east Burlington off of Graham-Hopedale Road, coordinating relief efforts.

"Today, while we haven't seen much of an impact in Alamance County, departments are working really hard,” said Michelle Mills, spokesperson for Alamance County. “We are continuing to up our staff and have our shelter prepared for any evacuees that come our way. We are working really hard to make sure that everyone is all set.“

As of Sunday afternoon, the National Weather Service in Raleigh was forecasting limited wind impacts and power outages in the area. The big concern now is flash and river flooding.

The average rainfall across Alamance County from Florence so far is 2 inches, but amounts varied from 1 to 3 inches depending on the location, according to Kathleen Carroll, a meteorologist with the NWS. Wind gusts topped out at 37 mph at the Alamance-Burlington Regional Airport on Friday, Sept. 14.

For general questions about emergency operations or the shelter, call 336-290-0362.

 

Bill Cresenzo can be reached at bcresenzo@thetimesnews.com or 336-506-3041. Follow him on Twitter at @BillCresenzoTN