Some artists don’t want to edit what they’ve written. Paul Edelman isn’t one of those.

When someone showed the Asheville, N.C.-based singer-songwriter that his music needed to be pared down a bit, he took it to heart.

“As a songwriter I’ve gotten more concise,” he said. “My songs used to be more rambling and longer. I’ve gotten into the practice of shaving them down and honing them. I think the songs are more reaching out to listeners than they have been. It’s got a little more rhythmic influence than the old ones. The old ones were more acoustic driven and more Americana.

“It was hard for me to realize that it needed to get done,” he continued. “It took a while for me to know that. When someone showed that to me, I was OK. I’m not one of those who is like ‘This is my art, man.’ I am like that, like all artists are, but I’ve been doing this a long enough time to realize this is also a business and there is a formula.”

Edelman’s band, The Jangling Sparrows, plays a rare hometown show this week with a 6 p.m. event Friday at French Broad Brewery in Asheville.

The Asheville market, Edelman said, is saturated with music so that makes it hard for musicians to play local gigs. The last time he played the town was last winter, he said.

He moved to Asheville 10 years ago from Philadelphia, because of the city’s central location and beautiful environment.

Instead of playing only on the local scene, Edelman has performed across the country. Most of the time he takes his full band, which includes drummer Joe Gray and bassist Louis Stein, on the road but there are times when he simply plays solo.

Friday’s show is with the full band and it will be a set that Edelman has honed over the past year. Many of the songs will be off his November release “140 Nickels.” That name is something that Edelman has mulled over for years. He actually used it as the title of a giveaway demo a few years ago.

“I was romanticizing about how broke I was and didn’t care,” he said. “The idea that I could sit there and pound through a six pack and write songs and not care about anything and when I ran out of beer I’d would scrape up enough change from my couch to go down to the corner bodega and buy another six pack. I was really hungry and had a lot of passion of what I was doing. I don’t want to forget that.”

The album has gotten plenty of good reviews, including the influential magazine No Depression writing that The Jangling Sparrows are “one of the best Americana bands we’ve heard this year.”

“Some of the people didn’t have to say the nice things they’ve said,” Edelman said. “They’ve gone out of their way to say things. They could have said ‘hey, this album exists and here’s the rundown.’ Which is great, but, some of them, holy moly, have said really nice things.”